John Galsworthy 14 August 1867 – 31 January 1933) was an English novelist and playwright. 

He is best known for his trilogy of novels collectively called The Forsyte Saga, and two later trilogies, A Modern Comedy and End of the Chapter. He was awarded the 1932 Nobel Prize in Literature. Born to a prosperous upper-middle-class family, Galsworthy was destined for a career as a lawyer, but found it uncongenial and turned instead to writing. He was thirty before his first book was published in 1897, and did not achieve real success until 1906, when The Man of Property, the first of his novels about the Forsyte family was published. In the same year his first play, The Silver Box was staged in London. As a dramatist he became known for plays with a social message, reflecting, among other themes, the struggle of workers against exploitation, the use of solitary confinement in prisons, the repression of women, and jingoism and the politics and morality of war.


Plays

• The Silver Box, 1906 • Joy, 1907 • Strife, 1909

• Justice, 1910 • The Little Dream, 1911

• The Pigeon, 1912 • The Eldest Son, 1912

• The Fugitive, 1913 • The Mob, 1914

• A Bit o' Love, 1915 • The Foundations, 1916

• The Skin Game, 1920 • Six Short Plays, 1921

• A Family Man, 1921 • Loyalties, 1922

• Windows, 1922 • The Forest , 1924

• Old English, 1924 • The Show, 1925

• Escape, 1926 • The Silver Spoon, 1926

• Exiled, 1929 • The Roof, 1929.